Are you an Efficacy Effector? What the butterfly effect can teach us about making and breaking efficacy

Many of us
have heard of the butterfly effect, coined by Edward Lorenz in 1961 which describes how a small change in one place, can result in a much bigger change later on; so if a butterfly flapped its wings in one place, with the right weather conditions it could create a hurricane in another place.
It is about how a seemingly trivial event can create an extremely different result than would have happened, if the minor event hadn’t occurred.  This is exactly how the Efficacy Effect works.
With the smallest of changes, influences, decisions and experiences we either place upon ourselves, or have thrust upon us by others, our entire life paths can be altered.  Anything or anyone that alters someone else’s efficacy, I call an ‘Efficacy Effector’.
Teachers, trainers, educators, leaders, coaches and parents are ideally positioned to be Efficacy Effectors.  Get it wrong, and you can ruin potentially magnificent and successful
futures.  Get it right, and you will create a butterfly effect of success stories and wonder in every life you touch.
To become an ‘Efficacy Effector’ by creating positive change in the lives of others, and providing them with the world’s greatest gift of efficacy, you need only to follow 5 steps:
1.
Purpose
– remember what you want the result or overall experience to be and make choices about your words and actions that are conducive to achieving this outcome
2.
Connect
–  find something in common with others, connect with them and reconnect them with the purpose
3.
Intercept
– remember that there is usually a difference between what people think they are capable of and what they are actually capable of. Change their mind-set, offer another perspective, encourage and challenge them to instigate change
4.
Reinforce
– highlight previous successes, existing skills, qualities and strengths. Remind them again of the importance of the positive result and sought-after emotional, physical and experiential states that will result from achieving it
5.
Transfer
– show them how progress has been made and how it can apply to other areas of their life. Allow progressive development by building upon the success with a slightly bigger goal – one big enough to challenge them, but not so hard that failure is inevitable. There is nothing like growing efficacy by succeeding at something that was initially perceived as a challenging task.
      How do you effect efficacy?
      Sarah xxx